Theme For An Imaginary Western

Theme For An Imaginary Western (J.Bruce)

Year: 1994
Band: Crash Wisdom
Album: Unreleased:
First Live Performance: 5/12/94
Last Live Performance: 6/2/94

Tabs:
Guitar
Bass

Lyrics:

When the wagons leave the city
For the forest and further on
Painted wagons of the morning,
dusty roads where they have gone
Sometimes travellin’ through the darkness,
Met the summer comin’ home
Fallen faces by the wayside,
Looked as if they might have known

Oh the sun was in their eyes,
And the desert was dry
In the country towns,
Where their laughter sounds

Oh the dancing and the singing
And the music when they played
Oh the fires that they started
Along the trail with no regrets
Sometimes they found it, sometimes they kept it
Often lost it along the way
Fought each other to possess it,
Often blind to the light of day

Oh the sun was in their eyes,
And the desert was dry
In the country towns,
Where their laughter sounds

Oh the sun was in their eyes,
And the desert was dry
In the country towns,
Where their laughter sounds

Analysis:

The opening song of both currently available Crash Wisdom sets, Theme For An Imaginary Western appears to have been the band’s standard opening number.  As with most other CW songs, it is unknown whether other versions exist. The song itself dates back to the late 1960s, originally appearing on the recently deceased Jack Bruce’s first solo album, Songs For A Tailor (1969).* The choice of cover is unsurprising in that Jack Bruce has been a major influence on Michael’s work, both in Cream and solo. Like the group’s cover of Sandy Denny’s ‘North Star Grassman and the Ravens’, Crash Wisdom’s version has a rather different arrangement than the original, with more emphasis on guitars and some tasteful solos.

* The author would like to suggest that this and Bruce’s solo follow-up Harmony Row (1971) are great albums and often overlooked.

Quotes: “The [Gibson] EB-03 was my very first bass, I thought it was cool because Jack Bruce played one in Cream…” Michael Steele, ‘GREETINGS INTREPID RPERS AND FRIENDS’ chat, 2003.

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